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Graduate CV template

By Michael Cheary

Just graduated, but unsure how to demonstrate your skills and experience on your CV? Here's our graduate CV template to help you get started:

Just graduated, but unsure how to demonstrate your skills and experience on your CV?

Writing your first CV after graduating can be tricky, especially if you're looking for your first professional position. With some subtle differences in format, length and style, any opportunity to get the upper hand, including viewing graduate CV examples, can help you stand out from the crowd.

To help you increase your chances of success, we've spoken with the experts to put together our CV template for graduates:


Just here for the template? Click the link below:

Personal statement

Always tailor this to the role in question. Generic introductions will not endear you to the recruiter, and are a waste of valuable space.

Consciously try and answer the following questions: who you are, what you can offer, and what you aim for in your career.

 

Personal statment

 

Education

Education should generally be the focus of a Graduate CV. Write in reverse-chronological order, with the most recent events coming at the top.

Include your degree classification, A level/IB results and any other higher education diplomas. In direct terms, particular course modules you’ve undertaken may be relevant to a role or scheme you’re applying for and should be used to demonstrate your wider knowledge of the subject.

When it comes to GCSEs, stating the number and general grades is fine, although most employers will ask for specific grades when it comes to Maths and English.

 

Education

 

Hobbies & Interests

A Hobbies and Interests section is optional. If they’re particularly individual, or actually back up your motives for applying for this role, then they should be included.

Ask yourself: Will they help you get the job? Socialising with friends and going to the cinema, for example, will probably be of little interest to the employer.

Finally, make sure you’re happy to expand upon them during your interview if called upon.

 

Hobbies and interests

 

Employment history

Chances are, you may not have that much previous work history to include here, and if you do it may not all be relevant. If this is the case, feel free to be brief here.

After stating your dates of employment, company name and job title, putting a few top line duties will generally suffice. However, wherever possible, try and demonstrate your success in practical ways.

Not only will they help quantify your output, they will also help validate your awareness of meeting targets/key responsibilities.

 

Work experience

 

References

Unless asked directly in the job posting, making them available on request is fine. In any case, most will probably start by verifying dates etc. with previous employers.

 

Need to start again? Create a professional, fully formatted CV in minutes using the free reed.co.uk CV Builder.

 

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